Summer 2004

Dear Valued Malloy's Nursery Customers,

We are pleased to bring you the the summer edition of the Malloy's Nursery Plant News. This issue we are focusing on the new plants we are growing for you. see list. Most of these new plants will be ready for purchase in the fall. Please call for availability. Remember, this electronic Newsletter will be delivered seasonally and will give you an overview of what's growing at Malloy's Nursery.We will highlight a few plants to give you the first scoop on what is "hot". and also include some plant growing hints and landscaping ideas that we hope you will find helpful.

There are many NEW plants that are growing at Malloy's. Take a look at the list below!

Please let us know how we can be of help to you in future newsletters. Your feedback and suggestions are always welcome.

Yours,

The Malloy Family

info@malloynursery.com

 

 


What's Blooming at Malloy's Nursery!

New Plants

Native Plants

 

 

 

 

Malloy's Nursery

Newsletter Archive
To access the past Malloy's Nursery Newsletters see below:

Malloy's Nursery Plant News-SPRING 2004

 
   
   

 

 

 

 

More Roses @ Malloy's

Did you hear that the Knockout Rose was a fabulous rose,
that it is easy to grow, blooms all year in warm weather, is a carefree grower,
and one of the hardiest roses on the market today.

You heard right and now Malloy's Nursery in Montecello, FL
has
more ever bearing/carefree ROSES for you to select from.

Knock Out
Nearly Wild
CareFree Sunshine
Pink Knock Out
Ice Meidiland
Blushing Knock Out

 

To see information about Roses click on each rose.

In depth information about the Knock Out and Nearly Wild Roses
can be found in the Malloy's Plant News-Spring Issue click here!

 

 

 

 

 

It's Easy -
to Grow Roses in Your Garden


Preparation of the soil to grow roses


The soil is very important in growing roses. To keep your roses healthy for years to come thoroughly prepare the soil 2 or 3 weeks before planting them so that the earth has time to settle properly. Remove the roots of weeds along with any stones or other debris. Scatter fertilizer over the surface and then dig in.

Observe and Amend the Soil When Necessary
In some cases, it can be useful to improve your soil by adding correctors which should be mixed with the soil when it is forked over. Here are some helpful hints for improving your soil.

Clay Soil
Impermeable, heavy, sticky when damp and hard when dry.
Amend by adding coarse sand, peat, compost and horticultural limestone if the soil is not already chalky.

Sandy Soil
Dries out too quickly, does not retain fertilizing elements.
Amend by adding humus in the form of compost, black peat, manure…

Chalky Soil
Lacks fertilizing elements, dry in summer, muddy when it rains, makes many plant species go yellow.
Amend by adding peat or compost. Mix 200 to 300 g of sulphur per sq. am. with the soil.

Humus-rich Soil
Acid, often damp, many of the fertilizing elements cannot be assimilated.
Amend by adding horticultural limestone to neutralize the acidity.


Soil should be dug over to a depth of about 40 or 50cm for planting roses. Make sure all the fertilizers scattered on the surface are thoroughly mixed with the earth before planting.

Choosing a Fertilizer

Mineral fertilizers: You may use a total fertilizer. This contains the three elements vital for plant growth: nitrogen (N), phosphorous(P) and potassium (K). Always stick to the doses recommended on packaging to avoid "burning" your plants.

Organic fertilizers: Dried or granulated manure, compost, ground bones, seaweeds are all fertilizers which have varied NPK formulas. Organic Elements help tremendously to build and amend the soil and the can be used to complement a mineral fertilizer. Some organic fertilzer manufacturers even produce universal fertilizers which combine mineral and organic fertilizers andare very easy to use.


• Never place fertilizer in direct contact with roots to avoid burning them.

• Try and use a fertilizer rich in phosphoric acid and potassium in autumn and a nitrogen-rich formula in spring.

 

The Secret to Rose Success!

Roses Love Water
Beautiful rose bushes can easily be grown in your garden or container. All it takes is lots of sun, a little fertilizer and, of course, consistent watering.

Nothing is more important for a rose bush's survival and performance when first planting a rose than water. Whether you choose to grow roses in containers or in a garden setting, roses absolutely love water. The key is to adopt correct watering practices for your particular rose situation and climate. What is correct also depends on sun exposure, type of soil and the method of watering.

In general, soil for roses should be watered deeply, but infrequently. And even during winter, occasional watering of garden roses during dry periods will help them perform better during the next growing season. For container roses, keeping close tabs on the soil's moisture condition is important for drainage.

Initially, water the plant well to get the rose's root system firmly established. Carefully observe the rose plants and water approximately every other day for 3 months depending on natural conditions like rainfall, etc.As the rose begins to grow, stick a finger in the soil to check for moisture. If your finger comes out literally dry, it's time to add water. Muddy soil means the plant is getting too much water. Moist soil should be an indicator that the water amount is just about right.

Basic rules to follow for watering your roses:

1- Roses should receive 1 to 2 inches of water each week. Rule of thumb is to water two to four times a week for about 30 minutes, especially if there is no rainfall, or in very hot or windy conditions. This applies when using a hose, bubblers or a drip system with 4-gallon emitters.

2 - Avoid wetting the plant's leaves during regular watering, which can spread disease.

3 - Sprinkle bushes about once a week with a spray nozzle hose attachment. This treatment not only adds water and humidity, it clears leaves of dust, dirt and spider mites or other harmful insects. But never sprinkle bushes in the afternoon or evening, which can promote disease.

4 - Water in the morning to help prevent black spot and mildew.

5 - Mulch 2 to 3 inches deep around a bush to help retain moisture from watering and reduce future watering needs. Mulching also helps keep the soil cool and helps control weeds.

The ever bearing and carefree roses Malloy's Nursery are growing are all drought and disease resistant varieties. Especially the Knock Out varieties which will do well in landscapes where watering may be inconsistent, as in a park setting or parking area for commercial applications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blushing Knock Out Rose®

Just like its parent The Knock Out TM Rose, the Blushing Knock Out Rose never stops performing. The light pink color changes nicely into a shell pink, as the bloom ages. This is another rose that thrives in humid climates where most other roses need spray and maintenance. A beautiful carefree rose that your garden should not be without.

DETAILS
Height/Habit - Bushy
Bloom Size - Medium
Foliage - Mossy green with blue hues
Petal Count 7-11
Fragrance - None
Parentage - Hybridizer Found by Yoder Brothers
Disease - Resistance Excellent
Uses - Hedge, Border, Foundation Plant, Color Groupings
Patent - PPAF

Zone Map 3-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pink Knock Out Rose®

The perfect companion to the Knock Out the Pink Knock Out is as tough and showy as its parent. This Lovely rose is medium pink and it is as carefree and hardy as the Knock Out. The Pink Knock Out blooms profusely and thrives in very humid climates where most other roses would need regular spray maintenance.

DETAILS
Height/Habit - Bushy 3-4 ft.
Bloom Size - Medium
Foliage - Mossy green with blue hues
Fragrance - None
Disease - Resistance is rated Excellent, Resists black spot, Tolerant of Downy Mildew
Uses - Hedge, Border, Foundation Plant, Color Groupings, Mass Plantings

Zone Map 3-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carefree Sunshine Rose®

From William Radler, the breeder who brought us the Knock Out now we have yellow Carefree Sunshine or 'Radsun'. This carefree rose bears abundant clusters of large, sweet, pristine yellow blooms on 3-4 ft plants from spring to fall.
Carefree Sunshine is especially heat resistant and continues to bloom even in the hottest summer heat with non-fading blooms. This beautiful rose in virtually maintenance free. Another rose you won't want to be without!


DETAILS
Height/Habit - Med.-tall, Rounded, Bushy 3-4 ft.
Bloom Size - Medium-large, Double
Foliage - Bright green
Petal Count 20 - 25
Fragrance - Slight Sweet
Parentage - Hybridizer William Radler
Disease - Resistance Excellent
Uses - Hedge, Border, Foundation Plant, Color Groupings, Mass Planting
Patent - PP #13063

Zone Map 3-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ice Meidiland Rose®
       
Enjoy your garden, don't be enslaved by it. The perfect rose for busy people. The showy clear white blooms have a hint of pearl pink that will brighten your garden day and evening from spring through fall in temperate zones.
'Meivahyn'  or Ice Meidiland is a great medium groundcover that has arching canes and excellent disease tolerance.


DETAILS
Height/Habit - 1.5' high with 6 ' spread, Groundcover
Bloom Size - Medium, pompom shaped
Foliage - Medium glossy green, fast grower
Petal Count 20 - 25
Fragrance - None
Parentage - Hybridizer
Disease - Resistance Very Good
Uses - Ground Cover, Mounding Ground Cover, Cascading over Hillsides
Patent Pat.- #11577

Zone Map 3-9

 

* The information that is presented in this newsletter is the most cureent available and is accurate to the best of our knowledge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

See the List of New Plants at Malloy's Nursery

List of newest plants!

Malloy's Online Plant Catalog

Native Plants at Malloy's Nursery

 

 
 

What's Blooming at Malloy's for SUMMER

Click Here!

 

 

 

The Latest Malloy's Color Catalog - Price List for Fall 2004 is out.

Please let us know if you need one.

info@malloynursery.com

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What's Blooming @ Malloy's Nursery

starting in May

 

Crape Myrtles

Red “Dynamite” Crape Myrtle

Pink “Miami” Crape Myrtle

Lavender “Muskogee” Crape Myrtle

Purple “Catawba” Crape Myrtle\

white “Natchez” Crape Myrtle

Pink “Pink Velour”Crape Myrtle

Dark Red “Tonto” Crape Myrtle

coral pink “Tuscarora” Crape Myrtle


Hydrangeas

blue/pink Nikko Blue

white Sister Teresa


Viburnam

white 'Reiflers densa'

white Japanese Snowball

Magnolias

white Bracken Beauty

white Little Gem

white D.D. Blanchard

Roses

pink with yellow centers Nearly Wild

red Knock Out®

Grassses

ferny mauve Maiden Grasses

white-tan Muhly Grass


Herbaceous Plants

Blue Lily of the Nile

yellow and multi-pastels Lantana

Vines

coral with yellow centers Cross Vine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malloy's Nursery New Plants June 2004

SHRUBS
Botanical / Common Name & sizes
Abelia, Little Richard - #1,#3
Agarista populifolia, Florida Leucothoe - #1,#3
Callicarpa Americana, Beauty Berry - #1,#3
Cordyline “Red Sister”, Soft Yucca,Red Sister - #1,#3
Cordyline “Sensation”, Soft Yucca - #1,#3
Cordyline “Variegata”, Soft Yucca - #1,#3
Cryptomeria Globosa, Globosa - #1,#3
Cupressus sempervirens, Italian Cypress - #3,#7
Ilex cassine, Dahoon Holly - #1,#3,#7
Ilex cornuta, Oak Leaf Holly - #1,#3,#7
Ilex crenata, Sky Pencil Holly- #1,#3,#7
Ilex glabra, Inkberry or Gallberry - #1,#3
Itea virginica, Sweetspire - #1,#3
Itea virginica “Henry’s Garnet”, Sweetspire - #1,#3
Itea virginica “Little Henry” ®, Sweetspire, - #1,#3
Juniperus chinensis “Blue Point”, Juniper - #1,#3
Juniperus silicicola, Southern Red Cedar - #1,#3,#7
Juniperus “Spartan”, Juniper - #1,#3
Lagerstroemia Indica
“Dynamite” Crape Myrtle - #3,#7,#15
“Pink Velour” Crape Myrtle - #3,#7,#15
Lyonia lucida, Fetterbush - #1,#3
Lyonia ferruginea, Rusty Lyonia - #1,#3
Nerium oleander, Hardy Red - #3
Osmanthus americanus, Devilwood, Wild Olive - #1,#3
Rosa “Hybrid”, Carefree Sunshine ® - #3
Rosa “Hybrid”, Blusing Knockout ® 1- #3
Rosa “Hybri”, Pink Knockout Rose ® - #3
Rosa “Hybrid”, Red Knockout Rose ® - #3
Rosa “Meivahyn”, Ice Meidiland ® - #3
Rosa “Hybrid” , Nearly Wild Rose - #3
Rosmarinus officianalis, Rosemary - #1,#3
Rhododendron Azaleas
“Vivid Red” Glen Dale - #1,#3
Rhododendron Native Azaleas
Rhododendron canescens, Admiral Semmes - #3
Rhododendron austrinum, Don's Varigated - #3
Rhododendron flammeum, Flammeum - #3
Rhododendron austrinum, Hotspur Yellow - #3
Rhododendron , Taylor Maid - #3
Rhododendron viscosum (selection) - #3
Rhododendron , Varnadoe's Phlox Pink - #3
Spiraea japonica “Goldmound” - #1,#3
Thuja “Green Giant”, Arbor-vitae,Yellow Cedar - #1,#3,#7,#15
Vaccinium darrowii, Darrows Blueberry - #1,#3
Vaccinium mysinites, Shiny Blueberry - #1,#3
Viburnum obovatum, Reiflers densa #1,#3
Viburnum macrocephalum sterile, Japanese Snowball - #3,#7
Viburnum obovatum “Walters” - #1,#3
Viburnum obovatum “Whorled Class” - #1,#3


PALM, CYCADS, FERNS
Botanical / Common Name & sizes
Butia capitata, Pindo Palm - #3,#7
Rhapidophyllum hystrix, Needle Palm - #3,#7,#15
Serenoa repens, Green Saw Palmetto - #3,#7
Serenoa repens, Silver Saw Palmetto - #3
Zamia pumila, Coontie Palm - #3,#7
Trachycarpus fortunei, Palm Windmill - #3,#7


GROUND COVERS
Botanical / Common Name & sizes
Conradina canescens, Scrub Mint - #1
Hypericum reductum, St. John’s Wort - #1
Liriope muscari “Super Green” - #1

FLOWERING VINES
Botanical / Common Name & sizes
Bignonia capreolata “Tangerine Beauty”, Cross Vine - #1,#3
Gelsemium sempervirens, Carolina Jessamine - #1,#3

FLOWERING HERBACEOUS PLANTS
Botanical / Common Name & sizes
Lantana camara “Confetti”, Tricolor - #1
Lantana camara “Gold Mound”, Gold Lantana - #1


TREES
Botanical / Common Name & sizes
Acer rubrum “Autumn Flame”, Red Maple - #7
Acer rubrum “October Glory”, Red Maple - #7
Acer rubrum “Florida Flame”, Red Maple - #7
Betula nigra “Dura Heat”, River Birch - #7
Cercis Canadensis, Red Bud - #7
Cornus florida, Dogwood - #7
Eriobotrya japonica, Loquat - #7
Gordonia lasianthus, Loblolly Bay - #7
Magnolia grandiflora, Bracken Beauty - #3,#7,#15
Magnolia virginiana, Sweet Bay - #7
Pinus palustris, Long Leaf Pine - #7
Pinus taeda, Loblolly Pine - #7
Quercus geminata, Sand Live Oak- #7
Quercus phellos, Willow Oak - #7
Quercus shumardii, Shumard Red Oak - #7
Taxodium distichum , Bald Cypress - #7


MALLOY’S BIG CONTAINER PLANTS
Botanical / Common Name & sizes
Acer rubrum “Autumn Flame”, Red Maple - #15,#25
Acer rubrum “October Glory”, Red Maple - #15,#25
Acer rubrum “Florida Flame”, Red Maple - #15,#25
Betula nigra “Dura Heat”, River Birch - #15,#25
Cercis Canadensis, Redbud - #15,#25
Cornus florida, Dogwood - #15,#25
Eriobotrya japonica, Loquat - #15,#25
Gordonia lasianthus, Loblolly Bay - #15,#25
Ilex cassine, Dahoon Holly - #15,#25
Ilex cornuta “Oak Leaf”, Oak Leaf Holly - #15,#25
Lagerstroemia “Indica”
“Dynamite” Crape Myrtle, Brilliant Red - #15,#25
“Pink Velour” Crape Myrtle, Brilliant Pink - #15,#25
Magnolia grandiflora, Bracken Beauty - #15,#25
Pinus palustris, Long Leaf Pine - #15,#25
Pinus taeda, Loblolly Pine - #15,#25
Quercus geminata, Sand Live Oak - #15,#25
Quercus phellos, Willow Oak - #15,#25
Quercus shumardii,Shumard Oak - #15,#25
Quercus virginiana, Live Oak - #15,#25
Taxodium distichum , Bald Cypress - #15,#25
Thuja “Green Giant”,
Arbor-vitae, Yellow Cedar - #15,#25
Ulmus parvifolia sempervirens, Drake Elm - #15,#25
Ulmus parvifolia Emer, Allee Elm - #15,#25


* Please see latest price list for color pictures and a complete description for each new plant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Native Plants at Malloy's Nursery - June 2004
* Please see latest price list for color pictures and a complete description for each new plant.


SHRUBS
Botanical / Common Name
Agarista populifolia, Florida Leucothoe
Callicarpa Americana, Beauty Berry
Cryptomeria Globosa, Globosa
Hydrangea guercifolia , Oak Leaf Hydrangea
Ilex cassine, Dahoon Holly
Illex cornuta, Carissa Holly
Ilex opaca “American”, American Holly
Ilex vomitoria, Yaupon Holly
Illicium floridanum, Native Red Anise
Illicium parviflorum, Ocala Anise
Itea virginica, Sweetspire
Juniperus silicicola, Southern Red Cedar
Lyonia lucida, Fetterbush
Lyonia ferruginea, Rusty Lyonia
Myrica cerifera, Wax Myrtle
Osmanthus americanus, Devilwood, Wild Olive
Podocarpus macrophyllus, Yew Podocarpus
Rhaphiolepis indica “Alba”, Indian Hawthorne
Rhododendron Native Azaleas
Rhododendron canescens, Admiral Semmes
Rhododendron austrinum, Don's Varigated
Rhododendron flammeum, Flammeum
Rhododendron austrinum, Hotspur Yellow
Rhododendron, Taylor Maid
Rhododendron viscosum (selection)
Rhododendron, Varnadoe's Phlox Pink
Vaccinium darrowii, Darrows Blueberry
Vaccinium mysinites, Shiny Blueberry
Viburnum obovatum, Reiflers densa
Viburnum obovatum “Walters”
Viburnum obovatum “Whorled Class”


GROUND COVERS
Botanical / Common Name & sizes

Conradina canescens, Scrub Mint
Hypericum reductum, St. John’s Wort

PALMS
Botanical / Common Name

Rhapidophyllum hystrix, Needle Palm
Serenoa repens, Green Saw Palmetto
Serenoa repens, Silver Saw Palmetto
Zamia pumila, Coontie Palm

TREES
Botanical / Common Name
Acer rubrum “Florida Flame”, Red Maple
Betula nigra “Dura Heat”, River Birch
Cercis Canadensis, Redbud
Cornus florida, Dogwood
Ilex “East Palataka”, Palataka
Ilex “Savanaha”, Savannah
Magnolia virginiana, Sweet Bay
Pinus palustris, Long Leaf Pine
Pinus taeda, Loblolly Pine
Quercus geminata, Sand Live Oak
Quercus phellos, Willow Oak
Quercus shumardii, Shumard Red Oak
Quercus virginiana, Live Oak
Taxodium distichum, Bald Cypress

 

 

 

 

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